Shannon Casey

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Miracles of Enough

By Shannon Casey

Day 1 of 5: In the midst of scarcity, there is enough.

“stay mindful of your relationship to enough. […] How much love would feel like enough? Can you imagine being healed enough? Happy enough? Connected enough? Having enough space in your life to actually live it? Can you imagine being free enough?”

-adrienne maree brown, Pleasure Activism, p. 16

Even in the midst of despair, there is hope. It’s a counterintuitive reality, so I am especially grateful for the way in which Krista Tippett is able [to articulate] it(https://onbeing.org/programs/living-the-questions-1/). This “both/and” approach toward hope and despair has given me a better framework for understanding another counterintuitive reality—that even in the midst of scarcity, there is enough.

Most days, it doesn’t feel like this is true. Nevertheless, I believe that this is true—I trust that this is true; I have faith that this is true. I don’t believe in the prosperity gospel, but I do believe that God provides for us. Faithfully and consistently, God sustains us.

There are so many stories in the Bible of that-which-is-not-enough being supernaturally transformed into enough. Notably, despite the miraculous outcomes, these stories do not dismiss or diminish circumstances of scarcity. The scarcity is real. People lack that which is necessary, and this has actual potential consequences. In 2 Kings 4:1-7, the widow’s sons could have lawfully been taken as slaves to pay her debt. At the wedding celebration without enough wine (John 2:1-10), the master of the banquet risked profound embarrassment and social disgrace. When the large crowd followed Jesus (John 6:5-13), more than five thousand people stood a chance of going hungry.

These stories highlight the types of scarcity that we tend to think of first—forms of lack related to one’s financial and physical needs. However, as adrienne maree brown’s questions imply, scarcity may also exist in terms of one’s intangible and emotional needs: the need for love, healing, happiness, connection, spaciousness, and freedom.

Some days, it is difficult to imagine that enough is even possible. Nevertheless, these Bible stories about scarcity being transformed into enough help renew our faith. Maybe, somehow, enough is possible.

Revisit adrienne maree brown’s questions and consider the ones that resonate with you the most. What would enough feel like?

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