Fruit of the Spirit: Day 9 of 11

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The Fruit of the Spirit – Living a Spirit-filled life

 “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law.” -Galatians 5:22 (NIV)


Day 9: Faithfulness

 “Again, it will be like a man going on a journey, who called his servants and entrusted his wealth to them. To one he gave five bags of gold, to another two bags, and to another one bag, each according to his ability. Then he went on his journey. The man who had received five bags of gold went at once and put his money to work and gained five bags more. So also, the one with two bags of gold gained two more.  But the man who had received one bag went off, dug a hole in the ground and hid his master’s money.”  Matthew 25:14-23 (NIV)

“After a long time the master of those servants returned and settled accounts with them. The man who had received five bags of gold brought the other five. ‘Master,’ he said, ‘you entrusted me with five bags of gold. See, I have gained five more.’

“His master replied, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master’s happiness!’

“The man with two bags of gold also came. ‘Master,’ he said, ‘you entrusted me with two bags of gold; see, I have gained two more.’

“His master replied, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master’s happiness!’

In this parable the servants are charged with their master’s money while he is away. When the master returns and sees that the first servant has made use of the money entrusted to him, he comments him for being, “good and faithful.” A faithful person is dependable. You can count on her to fulfill her commitments, and to do what she says she will do. She uses the resources she was given to do the job she was given to do.

In this story the word talent refers to a unit of money, like a dollar. The English definition of a talent comes from this parable, and is based on its interpretation: We are each entrusted with our skills and abilities to use them to do Christ’s work in the world until he returns. In fact, our very lives are gifts entrusted to us by God. Mary Oliver asks in the poem The Summer Day, “What is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?”

I don't know exactly what a prayer is.
I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down
into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,
how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,
which is what I have been doing all day.
Tell me, what else should I have done?
Doesn't everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?

What does it look like to you to be faithful to God with your life? What tasks, assignments, or responsibilities has God charged you with, both in your current situation and further ahead?


About The Author

Jessica Kantrowitz spent many years in seminary, earning an M.Div. from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, and in various ministries to both Americans and international students. When a health crisis coincided with a faith-shift she left her job in an Evangelical parachurch organization and rediscovered her joy in writing. Her work has been published on Think Christian and The Good Men Project and shared widely throughout social media, in particular her essays, Bake for them two and Things I've been wrong about for most of my life, part one. She lives in Boston where she also works as a nanny and an academic editor. You can find her at her blog, Ten Thousand Places, and on Facebook and Twitter.